Articles Tagged with: interview

Rowan Newton – Episode 8 of the Delphian Podcast is now live!

Rowan Newton – Episode 8 of the Delphian Podcast is NOW LIVE!

episode 8 - rowan newton

South London born painter Rowan Newton joins us for this episode of The Delphian Podcast where we talk about his debut solo exhibition, Fractured Integrity, with Jealous Gallery as well as surviving as an artist, the role and state of art fairs in London and his own podcast Art Proof.

 

Listen now on our website HERE, or search DELPHIAN PODCAST in iTunes, Spotify, or Podbean.

 

Please don’t forget to Like, Share, and Subscribe!


Rhiannon Salisbury – Episode 7 of the Delphian Podcast is now live!

Rhiannon Salisbury – Episode 7 of the Delphian Podcast is NOW LIVE!

episode 7

London based artist and the winner of the Delphian Open Call 2019 Rhiannon Salisbury is our guest for this episode of the Delphian Podcast. We sit down in her East London studio to talk about her work, the role that advertising imagery plays in her paintings, whether or not artists have a responsibility to teach the world something through their work and many other things that feed into her practice.

 

Listen now on our website HERE, or search DELPHIAN PODCAST in iTunes, Spotify, or Podbean.

 

Please don’t forget to Like, Share, and Subscribe!


David Shillinglaw – Episode 6 of the Delphian Podcast is now live!

David Shillinglaw – Episode 6 of the Delphian Podcast is NOW LIVE!

David Shillinglaw

We join artist David Shillinglaw in his studio in Margate for this edition of the Delphian Podcast to talk about his work, painting murals around the world and the importance of play in art. We also talk about his side project Dirty Paradise which he runs along with others which has been making appearances over the past few years, bringing artists together from all corners of the globe!

 

Listen now on our website HERE, or search DELPHIAN PODCAST in iTunes, Spotify, or Podbean.

 

Please don’t forget to Like, Share, and Subscribe!


Jerry Gogosian – art world satirist and illusive commentator

Jerry Gogosian is the self-styled “TMZ of the art world” Instagram account. It’s creator is anonymous, and much speculation surrounds the account.
No art-world figure is beyond satire, and the account pokes fun at everyone from collectors and dealers, to artists and gallerists. I decided to find out more, so we had a little chat…

 

Benjamin Murphy – How anonymous is your identity, and is it anonymous out of self-preservation?
I’d imagine you upset a few thin-skinned people from time to time.

Jerry Gogosian – I keep telling people that the identity behind Jerry Gogosian is the least important part of this project. Of course (and for the first time) I’ve got haters…why I’m not really so sure. They insist on speculating about my identity and “outing” or “cancelling” me, but ultimately they matter so very little to me. I started this account for my own personal satisfaction and a way to blow-off steam. This was never meant to get as big as it did.

BM – Yeah I get that, ultimately it’s not about you. Perhaps the hate is coming from people who take themselves much too seriously?

JG – I think the hate comes from people who are personally and professionally frustrated. Ironically, the higher up on the food chain the subjects of my jokes tend to be, the less they seem to care themselves and will usually play along with the joke. Last week I made a joke about Marc Glimcher of PACE. He loved it and played along in the comments section.

BM – Thats great. I think across all walks of life, those that are the most afraid of critique are those that are the least comfortable in themselves, and least confident in what they’re doing.

JG – Yeah…
Art is deadly serious, but the Vanity Fair behind it is hilarious. That’s truly where the jokes are directed.

BM – I think there is a lot of “The Emperors New Clothes” in the art world, and people are perhaps afraid of being called out on their bullshit, or, people are afraid of being labeled as being a bullshitter when they aren’t one.

JG – Maybe this is cruel sounding but I don’t really worry about the psychological make up of those kinds of people. People in general can have a lot of fear, I acknowledge that. If I sat around and worried about insecure people, I’d be insecure.

BM – Good choice of words – I think those that can’t take a joke are the insecure ones.
I suppose what I’m getting at, is do you think that people in the art world are less willing to be satirised?

JG – No they love it. People dm me asking me to make jokes about them…

BM – Oh that’s good, that’s not what I, and I’d imagine many others, would have expected.

JG – Well I make relatable character profiles that a lot of people see themselves reflected in.

BM – Maybe its validation in a way, being significant enough to have jokes made about you.

JG – Yeah in the beginning some other artworld meme pages were giving me a hard time, and then someone was like, if they aren’t talking about you, then you’re not doing a good enough job.

‪BM – Exactly‬‬.

‪JG – So I don’t really let it bother me and neither should it bother anyone else. ‬‬‬

‪Memes are mostly throw-away entertainment anyway. HOT today. Gone tomorrow.‬‬‬

jerry gogosian

BM – So did you start the page out of some kind of frustration with the art world – is this a way of you taking people down a peg or two‬‬, or is it much less malevolent?‬‬

JG – I don’t think of it as a take down… maybe just a hot take on the art world.
It has turned into a community at this point with high net followers and young emerging artists with everything in between.

BM – That’s nice. I think the world needs satire now more than ever.

JG – We need to laugh, right?

BM – And we need to be able to laugh at ourselves.

JG – Yeah it is healthy. When I started this, I just assumed it was already happening.

jerry gogosian

BM – In a wider sense, do you think people are less willing to be satirised, less willing to be disagreed with, and less willing to be offended than ever before?
It seems like no-one is willing to listen to opinions that conflict with their own anymore.

JG – We live in a culture addicted to outrage. Period.
I do not operate in that realm.

BM – That outrage only serves to shut down debate, and keep people all the more separate.
I think if people were a lot less quick to offend, a lot of the political strife that the EU and America find themselves in would be less extreme.

JG – We live in rough times, but I think we’ve lost something…the notion of love in our daily vernacular. I’m not talking about “OMG I love you” bullshit but rather practicing love and compassion towards those around us on a daily basis.

BM – Even to those whom we completely disagree with.

JG – In that sense I am a Christian (omfg Jerry Gogosian is a CHRISTIAN)

I just like what Jesus taught.

BM – As a philosopher he was great.

JG – We lack a redemptive allowance in our culture for people to make mistakes, instead these media outrage cycles tear the person down and leave them in the dust. I do not believe in this.

BM – Yeah, and if you approach people in an aggressive way you just put them on the defensive, and then there’s no way you can change their opinion.

JG – And you underline that YOU are THEIR enemy, it doesn’t work.

‪ ‬jerry gogosian
BM – Why is art valuable?‬‬

JG – Because it is the sacred expression of a life lived and reflected through the moment in which it passed. My favorite teacher once said “art is the one place where there are zero laws”‬‬

‪Science is rules and laws that you work with and within.

BM – That’s very liberating‬‬.

‪JG – And in terms of education, yes, learning and understanding history are essential, but the other component that cannot be intellectually taught, only emotionally learned is that we are completely free to create. ‬‬‬

‪BM – Perhaps that’s why certain people become artists; it attracts rule breakers because there are no rules‬‬.‬
That’s probably why I became interested in it in the first place.‬‬

So if you could give one piece of advice to someone at the very start of their art journeys, what would that be?‬‬

‪JG – Go to business school. Become a nurse. Become a teacher. Get a hard skill that you can fall back on when shit gets hard‬. ‬
‪An career cannot be plotted like a doctor’s career…‬‬‬

‪You’ve got to be ready to endure some extreme hardship. ‬‬‬

jerry gogosian

For more interviews:

Diabolical – Valerie Savchits

For more by Jerry Gogosian

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Chiara Williams – Episode 5 of the Delphian Podcast is now live!

Chiara Williams – Episode 5 of the Delphian Podcast is NOW LIVE!

chiara williams

For episode 5 of the Delphian Podcast, we catch up with Chiara Williams, an artist, gallerist and educator. We talk to her about her time running WW Gallery from her home in East London, to guerilla shows at the Venice Biennale and starting the SOLO Award at London Art Fair.

 

Listen now on our website HERE, or search DELPHIAN PODCAST in iTunes, Spotify, or Podbean.

 

 


Episode 4 of the Delphian Podcast is now live!

Episode 4 of the Delphian Podcast is NOW LIVE!

episode 4

We sit down with long time Delphian friend and Beers London artist Andrew Salgado at his London studio. Andrew, a Canadian painter has been based in London for a long time now and we and discuss social media, politics and theory in art as well as consistency in an artists output.

 

Listen now on our website HERE, or search DELPHIAN PODCAST in iTunes, Spotify, or Podbean.

 

 


Diabolical – A Conversation with Valerie Savchits

Valerie Savchits was one of the Judges Picks in our 2019 Delphian Open Call, and we really love her expressive, often darkly-comic works. We decided to find out a little more about her work, and what it all means.

 

Benjamin Murphy – Firstly, why are you an artist?

Valerie Savchits – When I was about 2-3 years old my mother introduced me to drawing – she was kind of into designing and drawing in her teenage years. Between 2005-2008 I used to paint on the streets with my classmates like real vandals, but in 2009 something shifted in me and I realised that I’m really into chemistry, I even started my Chemical Technology course in Riga Technical University in 2012 but deep down I knew that I have to stick to what really cures me, allows to transmit flows of ideas and raise my voice on many important topics. My parents were brought up in Soviet times, were a little strict and believed you need to go into a solid profession so you can feed yourself. They simply wanted me to find a job in an office or do 12h shifts in some restaurant not far from home and that’s it.

They always wanted only best for me and their intentions were always good but at the same time they were trying to put an idea into my head that I need to have a stable income, have kids by the age of 21 and make my art my hobby because it’s unrealistic to be an artist in Latvia or elsewhere – it wasn’t even a profession for them.

But I just didn’t care – despite their endless efforts, I just ignored about 80% of what they were saying to me. Diabolical, I know. If I listened to every single advice they ever gave to me, I wouldn’t be where I am now and having this conversation with you. So, being already a colossal failure for my parents because I didn’t live up to their expectations, I embraced my rebellious nature and moved to Manchester to study arts in hope it will help me to understand myself a bit more.

BM – So would you say that a spirit of rebellion is a salient part of your work too?

VS – Sure, this is something inevitable – I need to spill this explosive energy out so it transforms into the characters you see in my work.

valerie savchits

Dissolved into nothingness

BM – Who are these characters in your work and what do they represent?

VS – Very often the characters in my work are a projection of my memory or simply an embodiment of symbiosis of current emotions. Sometimes my characters take shape / are born from the conversations I heard in real life or movies or read in books – I’m a huge fan of dystopian science fiction, especially its sub-genre cyberpunk and it’s been influential on my work for quite some time.

May be this year I’ll try to work on self-portraiture – this is something I haven’t done before and definitely outside of my comfort zone.

BM – If the characters in your work represent your memories or your emotions, how will these new self-portraits differ from your current work?

VS – The thing is that all the characters in my current work never happened to depict me – those memories and emotions were usually connected with or evoked by someone or something else. For example I dedicated a few works to my mother which depicted my complicated relationship with her and what you actually see on canvas is either an animal, a burning house or a bunch of bones – it can take any shape.

Now I want to try out different guises, explore my body lines and mimics and it’s going to be one of the hardest things to do – to capture my own essence, because sometimes I catch myself thinking that even complete strangers know more about me than I do about myself. I think this could be a good change for me to become my own subject and this self-portrait project will also develop in parallel with my current work.

Valerie Savchits

Phenomenal Idiots

BM – Are they dedicated to her because they contain something that you want to say about her, or is it something you want to say to her rather than about her?

VS – It’s just the way I express my feelings or doubts about some topics (not about her persona) that I don’t necessarily want to tell her tête-à-tête – all my paintings or sculptures, including the ones I dedicated to members of my family, are like a personal diary.

BM – So what makes you so willing to share that personal diary with the world

VS – I’d say the main reason for this is that I often can’t keep my opinions to myself, the more I keep inside myself the more it becomes a catalyst for making me feel ambivalent and this simply drives me crazy in the aftermath. But at the same time I don’t like talking much and give long speeches, so I prefer to make a statement in a piece of artwork. I incorporate phrases both in Russian and English in all my work and this combination of image and text depicts my thoughts, emotions and observations more precisely than an ordinary diary ever could.

valerie savchits

I’ll See You Again

 

For more by Valerie Savchits, see her WEBSITE


Episode 3 of the Delphian Podcast is now live!

Episode 3 of the Delphian Podcast is NOW LIVE!

episode 3

In episode 3 of The Delphian Podcast we talk to artist, curator and author Rosalind Davis. In her personal work, Rosalind produces multi-disciplinary works about the transformation of space. She has also been the permanent curator at Collyer Bristow Gallery in London since 2016 and has curated over 30 exhibitions to date. In 2016 she co-authored the book “What they didn’t teach you at art school” with Annabel Tilley and she is a regular lecturer at universities, galleries and organisations across the country.

 

Listen now on our website HERE, or search DELPHIAN PODCAST in iTunes, Spotify, or Podbean.

 

Read more about Rosalind  HERE


Clutch // Agarrar – Robin Footitt interview

Clutch // Agarrar – Robin Footitt

Carlos Carvalho Arte Contemporânea, Lisbon, Portugal

Opening: Wednesday 26th June 2019; 6 – 8pm

Dates: 26/06 – 07/09/19

Clutch // Agarrar

Tell us about your new body of work, am I right in thinking it ties in with your last exhibition in London?

That’s right, it has been 6 months since ‘Open Window’ at New Art Projects, London and I felt that I needed to develop and revisit this sense of loss when using your hands creatively on digital operating platforms. Open Window was thematically concentrated on the language shift of meaning from its basis as a means to escape towards a term for single-minded focus when working on a computer. The solo exhibition at Carlos Carvalho Arte Contemporânea, Lisbon is titled ‘Clutch // Agarrar’ and is intended to reply to that instinct of snatching or grasping at something instinctively with your reactive hands.

It’s reasonable to say that the theme of detachment has reoccurred in many of my pieces, particularly in relation to hands – I’ve always been fascinated how hands can affect composition with specific signs in religious and historical paintings almost like their purpose is to gesture towards meaning. Personally, living as I do with a hearing impairment I always take gesturing as a clue to what I might not be hearing 100 percent of the time.

In Open Window you almost had three separate sections. Have you done that with Clutch // Agarrar and can you explain some of the pieces of work?

I’ve enjoyed the evolving language that the past two exhibitions at New Art Projects (Modern Grammar, 2016 and Open Window, 2018) have afforded me – working in the same space twice has given me the chance to play around with some of the disconnect I sometimes feel when working across different media outside of the studio. I see presentation as a medium in itself and the gallery space at Carlos Carvalho is vast and open – many works can be seen from one viewpoint and I want to see how these dynamics playout. So this was my starting point to develop new work, open space can sometimes give a virtual perfect thumbnail view of an artwork before you see it close up. I’m thinking of how colours were manipulated by the impressionists to see form when standing at distance from the canvas. So many of the works in Clutch // Agarrar operate differently when seen from those two points of view, an image will be solid and then unravel on closer inspection whether it be like the impressionists or from other forms of image manipulation. This has also meant that I have worked on a larger scale to realise such an impression from distance.

Clutch // Agarrar

What was the process of putting together this body of work?

Like I said previously, I needed to revisit a theme that came out of Open Window by facing it head on – a sense of loss when creativity is detached from touch and the mechanical use of your hands. I’ve been working on an intimate scale for some time, crafting larger work from smaller beginnings. One such beginning was the construction of cut paper collages using red, green and blue to replicate magnified pixels on various display screens from mobile phones, gaming consoles and digital tablets. I knew I wanted to show this work at the centre of the exhibition having previously used them to make patterned Lycra textiles and at Carlos Carvalho I have the opportunity to show these for the first time.

The Lycra artworks have returned but this time the stretching is minimal, I’m using the surface as a means to show subliminal images on top on the pixel RGB patterns with minimal distortion around the edges. An important work for me is a version of French Impressionist Gustave Caillebotte’s ‘Les raboteurs de parquet’; the original painting revealed its process by having the floor strippers peeling away the wooden boards and in doing so took the surface back to the bare canvas beneath. This has always struck me as quite a performative painting, like you feel the action of stripping down the basics of painting and that gives it a very special energy. Now in the context of Clutch // Agarrar there is a disconnect when viewing the image as a composed screen of pixelated dots – just as there would be if you were to do an image search on your phone right now to look up the painting that I’m talking about. It would be backlit as if Caillebotte were painting with light itself fully realised rather than mastering its effects with paint and canvas.

Would you say that exhibiting in a new country adds some fear or excitement? Did you feel you were second guessing or working with more freedom?

I’ve approached this show with the idea of a new audience in mind, the majority will have never seen my work before and may approach it from a completely different context. I wanted to be sensitive to that, to have a clear objective and a strong visual element but then again I always enjoy the uncertainty of two opinions. Having a bilingual title was my way of introducing this thought of duality – the English term clutch has a host of meanings, I found out that it’s even used in sports as a way of describing someone who came through in a difficult or trying time. Now, I asked a Portuguese friend if there was a similar term and he gave me two suggestions “agarrar” which means to grab, grasp, hold, cling, seize, clutch… the other was “apertar” which is to tighten, press, squeeze, pinch, clamp, clutch… so even in this I was reinterpreting meaning! Ultimately it will be about finding an unsettled middle ground – I’ve also played with the Portuguese language in some of my titles, finding symmetry in palindromes such as ‘Luz AzuL’, ‘SaraS’ and ‘SeleS’. The visual influence of Lisbon is included in a use of repeated azulejo tile patterns from Museu Nacional do Azulejo as well as producing a tile pattern directly from a sample of ‘Les raboteurs de parquet’.

This will be your first time exhibiting with Carlos Carvalho but you also were featured last month at PHOTO LONDON at Somerset House. How have you found working with the gallery so far and how did the relationship begin?

It began with a recommendation from fellow artist Tatiana Macedo, who is represented by Carlos Carvalho and a good friend of mine for over 15 years. We studied together at Central Saint Martins art college 2001-2004 and have kept in touch. I curated a solo show of her photography and video at 4 Windmill Street, London titled ‘Seems So Long Ago, Nancy’ in 2012. The process with the gallery took 2 years from initial dialogue and meetings to arranging the dates and content for the exhibition – I feel excitement from both sides about my involvement in Lisbon and they were kind enough to invite me to show a series of works from 2014 called ‘Closed Circuit Saga’ at PHOTO LONDON art fair this May alongside some of their artists (Anthony Goicolea, Isabel Brison, Jessica Backhaus and Mónica de Miranda). Their interest and engagement with this work gave me the confidence to expect great things from our collaboration.

Clutch // Agarrar

So its fair to say you’re looking forward to this new experience? Carlos Carvalho has a strong emphasis on photography, where do you see the placement of your work in this context?

Absolutely! I see the focus on photography that the gallery upholds as a useful one when approaching the visual work that I make. I mean visual in the sense of an overall image, we live in a digital culture where even text information is read visually before the content is absorbed on websites and banners. The work was collected post PHOTO LONDON so as I speak the artwork has arrived ahead of me! With the time I have before arriving in Lisbon to install I have made plenty of notes for how to hang these pieces and researching the rest of my trip. For the first time I have collaborated with a graphic designer, Jacinto Caetano to continue this identity beyond the exhibition so even the title of show has a strong visual presence. I’m looking forward to attending the opening night on Wednesday 26th June.

 

Interview by Rowan Newton

@robinfootittart


The Delphian Podcast – FIRST EPISODE

The Delphian Podcast is NOW LIVE!

the delphian podcast

For this first episode, we sit down with Kate Mothes, a curator and arts organiser currently based in the American Midwest. Kate runs Young Space, a curatorial project and online platform which emphasises new and exciting work by early-career and emerging artists. We talk about how it is to work outside of a major arts hub, online exhibitions, and how social media is changing the landscape for the arts.

 

The first episode can be listened on our website HERE, or on Spotify or the Podcast app.